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Nebulizer medications for asthma

post in: Beauty, Video Date:25 Aug 2017, 10:17 views:986

Nebulizer medications for asthma


By toyin fapohunda-adekola, MD Last Updated: Aug 14, 2017. Toyin Fapohunda-Adekola, MD, a board-certified physician in family medicine, yin Fapohunda-Adekola is a graduate of the University of Medicine Dentistry of New Jersey.

With experience as a health columnist for a women's magazine, Fapohunda-Adekola enjoys presenting intriguing medical knowledge in a demystifying manner. She strives to awaken the self advocate in us all.

As a chronic lung disease, asthma plan is commonly treated with inhaled medications delivered to the airways with either a handheld inhaler or a nebulizer. A nebulizer machine changes liquid medication into a mist inhaled through a mouthpiece or mask. In some some people, such as young children or older adults, a nebulizer is preferable to an inhaler because it requires little effort or manual dexterity.

Nebulizer medications may be for quick relief or long-term asthma control, and work in different ways. Albuterol (AccuNeb) and levalbuterol (Xopenex) are closely related medications used for quick relief of asthma symptoms.

Both can be delivered with a nebulizer. They medications act as bronchodilators, opening the airways that are constricted during an asthma attack.

Albuterol and levalbuterol relax the muscle cells of the airway walls, enabling better breathing. Asthma management guidelines published in 2007 by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommend short-acting bronchodilators like albuterol and levalbuterol as first-choice treatment for asthma flareups in children and adults.

They may be used alone or in combination with other drugs. Possible side effects of these medicines include temporary jitteriness and a racing heartbeat.

Ipratropium bromide is another type of bronchodilator that can be delivered with a nebulizer for relief of asthma flareups. It works by decreasing constriction of the muscle cells of the lung airways, but acts differently than albuterol and levalbuterol. The 2007 NIH and 2015 Global Initiative for Asthma (gina) treatment guidelines recommend use of ipratropium in combination with a short-acting drug like albuterol or levalbuterol for severe asthma attacks.

A premixed combination of albuterol and ipratropium (DuoNeb) is available for nebulizer use. Ipratropium is not recommended for use by itself for relief of sudden asthma symptoms.

 

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