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Asthma action plan guidelines for writing

post in: News, Video Date:06 Oct 2017, 14:29 views:4163

Asthma action plan guidelines for writing

Treatments and drugs, by Mayo Clinic Staff, prevention and long-term control are key in stopping asthma attacks before they start. Treatment usually involves learning to recognize your triggers, taking steps to avoid them and tracking your breathing to make sure your daily asthma medications are keeping symptoms under control. In case of an asthma flare-up, you may need to use a quick-relief inhaler, such as asthma albuterol.

The right medications for you depend on a number of things your age, symptoms, asthma triggers and what works best to keep your asthma under control.

Preventive, long-term control medications reduce the inflammation in your airways that leads to symptoms.

Quick-relief inhalers (bronchodilators) quickly open swollen asthma airways that are limiting breathing.

In some cases, allergy medications are necessary. Long-term asthma control medications, generally taken daily, are the cornerstone of asthma treatment.

These medications keep asthma under control on a day-to-day basis and make it less likely you'll have an asthma attack. Types of long-term control medications include: Inhaled corticosteroids. These anti-inflammatory drugs include fluticasone (Flonase, Flovent HFA budesonide (Pulmicort Flexhaler, Rhinocort flunisolide (Aerospan HFA ciclesonide (Alvesco, Omnaris, Zetonna beclomethasone (Qnasl, Qvar mometasone (Asmanex) and fluticasone furoate (Arnuity Ellipta).

You may need to use these medications for several days to weeks before they reach their maximum benefit. Unlike oral corticosteroids, these corticosteroid medications have a relatively low risk of side effects and are generally safe for long-term use. These oral medications including montelukast (Singulair zafirlukast (Accolate) and zileuton (Zyflo) help relieve asthma symptoms for up to 24 hours.

In rare cases, these medications have been linked to psychological reactions, such as agitation, aggression, hallucinations, depression and suicidal thinking. Seek medical advice right away for any unusual reaction. These inhaled medications, which include salmeterol (Serevent) and formoterol (Foradil, Perforomist open the airways.

 

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